What to see on an Antarctic cruise besides the Antarctic Peninsula

An Antarctica cruise is a once in a lifetime holiday so it’s worth doing the full experience.
Our Antarctica cruises not only take you to this extraordinary continent, we also cruise to two intriguing archipelagos. Little islands with big tales to tell, South Georgia Island is one of the most unique and important bio-diverse places on Earth and the Falkland Islands offer up plenty of natural beauty, along with an intriguing history.
 
Both places are the perfect addition to your time cruising Antarctica and on our incredible 19 day Antarctica, South Georgia & Falkland Islands you can visit all of the destinations below in a once-in-a-lifetime cruise.

Falkland Islands

The Falklands archipelago is teeming with wonders of nature and wildlife; an unpolluted environment with fantastically clear blue skies, seamless horizons, vast open spaces and stunning white sand beaches. The Islands are a natural paradise with tiny settlements nestling in many miles of open spaces, fascinating rivers of rock, seas of brilliant aqua greens and silvery blues. Our expert Discovery Team will curate your days to ensure you have a wonderful encounters.
Falkland Islands

South Georgia

The remote island of South Georgia is incredibly unique and has one of the world’s most biodiverse environments. Home to rugged mountain scenery, dazzling glaciers and charcoal cliffs, explore the beaches lined with fur and elephant seals, and the largest king penguin colonies during the height of breeding season. Once an important whaling station between 1904 to 1966, South Georgia is also the final resting place of explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, who visited the island several times during his Antarctic explorations.
South Georgia

South Orkney Islands

Situated 600km to the northeast of the Antarctic Peninsula, the South Orkney Islands, named after the Scottish Orkney Islands comprise four main islands; Coronation, Signy, Powell and Laurie, of which Coronation is the largest. Enjoy visits to the South Orkney Islands en route to and from the Antarctic Peninsula. Coronation Island is the most popular for landing, whilst Laurie Island houses the Argentinean research station. Observe the nesting chinstrap, Adélie and gentoo penguins alongside seals and white snow petrels against the barren landscape of glaciated rock and ice.
Adelie Pengun

South Shetland Islands

Comprising a string of 20 islands, the South Shetland Islands are almost completely covered by ice. Admire the large colony of chinstrap penguins and the 2,000 year old mossy banks at Elephant Island, which was made famous when 22 members of Shackleton’s Trans-Antarctic ‘Endurance’ expedition were stranded here for 105 days in 1916. The mysterious Deception Island is an active volcano with Its unique landscape comprises barren volcanic slopes, steaming beaches and ash-layered glaciers. It has a distinctive horse-shoe shape with a large flooded caldera. This opens to the sea through a narrow channel at Neptunes Bellows, forming a natural sheltered harbor. It is one of the only places in the world where vessels can sail directly into the center of a restless volcano. Deception also features the remains of an abandoned Norwegian-Chilean and British whaling station alongside nine different seabirds, 18 different species of lichens and mosses, fur seals and Chin Strap and Gentoo penguins.
Deception Island

Drake Passage

To get to Antarctica, you have to cross the infamous Drake Passage, the body of water between Cape Horn of South America and the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. This is where the Atlantic, Pacific, and Southern seas converge, and because the currents here meet no resistance from any nearby landmass, they’re known as some of the choppiest waters in the world.
Drake Passage

Lemaire Channel

Marking the gateway to the far south Antarctic Peninsula, Lemaire Channel measures 11 km long and 700 metres wide at its narrowest point, situated between Booth Island and the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the most spectacular sights in Antarctica, it is often named ‘Kodak Gap’ and features rugged mountain peaks, magnificent glaciers and steep rocky slopes.
Lemaire Channel